Friday, January 27, 2017

Blake Snyder’s Beat Sheet Compared to a Children’s Story Three-Act Structure


I heard about Blake Snyder’s book,”Save the Cat” from an illustrator who used his concepts to help him with his children’s book writing. I was curious what he meant and how he achieved this. So, I borrowed Save the Cat to find out. After reading the book, I discovered that Blake Synder’s uses, The Blake Synder Beat Sheet. This sheet consists of fifteen stages to create what he considers a successful movie script. The stages are 1) Opening Image, 2) Theme Stated, 3) Set-up, 4) Catalyst, 5) Debate, 6) Break into Two, 7) B Story, 8) Fun and Games, 9) Midpoint, 10) Bad Guys Close In, 11) All is Lost, 12) Dark Night of the Soul, 13) Break into Three, 14) Finale, 15) Final Image. I interpreted these fifteen stages and shortened to three steps, beginning, middle, and end of the movie. I thought this was similar to the three act structure for a children’s book story.
The three act structure just means a beginning, middle, and end of the children’s story. Act I for a children’s story is the introduction. The story introduces the protagonist and problem. This presentation is similar to Blake Snyder’s, Beat Sheet first three steps: Opening Image, Theme Stated, and Set-up. These three stages introduce the nature of the film. The screenplay poses a question or make’s a statement which is the message of the movie. The Set-up introduces all the characters; this seems to be similar to the introduction in a children’s story. The three act structure means a beginning, middle, and the end.

The next ten stages to Blake Snyder’s Beat Sheet is what I consider the middle of the movie script or middle of a children’s story. Blake Snyder’s ten additional stages are: Catalyst, Debate, Break into Two, B Story, Fun and Games, Midpoint, Bad Guys Close In, All is Lost, Dark Night of the Soul, and Break into Three. These ten stages are essential, all the characters introduced, and progress made with the plot heading to a final climax or resolution. In a children’s story, Act II, the main character takes action, and more action to solve his problem. The story comes to a down moment when all feels lost.

The Final and Final Image are the last two stages of Blake Snyder’s Beet Sheet. The Final is similar to Act III in a children’s story. The story comes to an end and lessons are learned. The story reaches a conclusion, except for tying up any loose ends. The Final Image with the Beat Sheet shows there is a change in the characters. The protagonist in the children’s story has solved his problem and learned something.

I suggest reading Blake Snyder’s, Save the Cat for the value it offers for sucessful story construction. I was able to apply these concepts to my own children’s picture book stories.

Sunday, December 4, 2016

Dani Duck Smart Dummies 2016 challenge



I want to thank Dani Duck for all her hard work she offered with this year's Smart Dummies 2016 challenge. I recommend anyone who needs a picture book dummy challenge to join the fun in 2017. I signed up for this year's challenge and was fortunate to complete my dummy. The aim of the challenge is to think about your book dummy, maybe start it, and if possible complete it. This year's challenge was a success. Dani needs your help to make Smart Dummies Challenge 2017 a success. There is just too much work for her to do it all alone. To find out more, follow the web link to her blog and read more about Dani's Smart Dummies 2017 challenge and help out.

Monday, November 7, 2016

SCBWI Bulletin Fall 2016 Article

This is my first foray writing an article for SCBWI Bulletin Fall 2016 magazine. SCBWI, thank you for the opportunity.

Thursday, September 1, 2016

Illustrations for Educational Consultant & Advocate for Gifted Children

Some artwork created for Educational Consultant & Advocate for Gifted children. I really didn't have any restrictions working on these images. Alison who coordinated the project was a pleasure to work with.

Wednesday, August 3, 2016

Another Flying Machine

Here is another version of a man and his flying machine. I created this illustration with the thought of the hilarious movie, Those Magnificent Men in their Flying Machines.